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Archive for the ‘Random’ Category

Pictures from High School

Random pictures I found on my computer that my friend Steven took in High School.

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Moon in North Carolina

Here’s a picture I took of the moon.  It has been really bright and neat looking with all the clouds these past few days. This is the only good picture I got out of about 10.  I would have taken more but my camera died and we can’t find the battery charger  😦

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We are hauling Megan’s car behind a uhaul truck next week.  Anybody ever done this?  Hoping I don’t crash and burn.

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From Uhaul:  

Phheww.

 

Auto Transporter User Instructions

U-HAUL HOTLINE
1-800-528-0355
24 HOURS – 7 DAYS A WEEK

Safety alert symbol – This safety alert symbol precedes all the safety messages in these instructions. Safety messages alert you to possible hazards and instruct you on how to avoid or reduce the risk of injury.

WARNING

Read and follow all of these instructions and safety messages before operating the auto transport trailer. Death, dismemberment or serious injury to you, your passengers, and others on the road may result if you do not follow these instructions. Make sure all drivers read and understand all these instructions.

See the Connecting your auto transport trailer section for auto transport trailer hook up instructions. A U-Haul representative can assist if you require assistance.

Important towing information

Prevent whipping by properly loading the auto transport trailer. The vehicle-in-tow must be loaded facing forward (front wheels on auto transport trailer). Loading the vehicle-in-tow backwards can cause the tow vehicle and the auto transport trailer “combination” to begin whipping, which is violent and uncontrollable sway.

Side to side motion (sway) that begins as you reach a certain speed, will likely become whipping at higher speeds. If you notice sway beginning slow down immediately by letting off the gas pedal. Then stop to check the auto transport trailer and vehicle-in-tow as soon as possible.

If whipping or sway occurs, do not steer, do not apply your brakes and never speed up. Let off the gas pedal and hold the steering wheel in a straight-ahead position.

A “combination disturbance” is improper handling, whipping, sway, over-steering or other deviation of the tow vehicle or auto transport trailer from their intended path, due to one or more causes (improper loading, steering inputs, excessive speed, cross winds, passing vehicles, rough roads, etc). If a combination disturbance occurs, do not steer or brake. Steering or braking during a disturbance can cause a loss of control or crash.

If a wheel goes off the paved roadway, do not steer sharply and do not brake. Let off the gas pedal and slow down below 25 mph. Then steer gradually back onto the roadway. Proceed with caution entering traffic.

Loading your Combination

The maximum weight of the vehicle-in-tow is listed on the fender decal on the auto transport. Never exceed this weight. The allowed vehicle-in-tow weights may be less for your tow vehicle. Never place a vehicle-in-tow on the auto transport trailer that is different than listed on your rental contract.

Never load cargo inside the vehicle-in-tow or on the auto transport trailer. Cargo weight inside the vehicle-in-tow can cause sway or whipping.

Never overload your tow vehicle. Do not exceed the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) and the Gross Axle Weight Ratings (GAWR), which are posted on a label inside the driver’s door opening.

Make sure the auto transport trailer is securely attached to the tow vehicle before loading and unloading. Keep children and others at least 25 feet away during loading and unloading.

Keep children and others at least 25 feet away during loading and unloading.

Slow down when towing

Avoid crashes by slowing down. Reduce your speed from what you would normally drive without a auto transport trailer under similar road conditions. The maximum speed is 55 mph when towing a U-Haul auto transport trailer. Do not exceed any posted speed limit.

Drive defensively – anticipate stops, brake early, and never follow closely.

Before going downhill, slow down and shift the transmission into a lower gear. Do not ride brakes on downgrades.

Slow down for curves, adverse weather, hazardous road conditions, road construction and expressway exits.

Before towing and while on the road

Use the checklist at the end of these instructions before towing and while on the road.

Make sure your tow vehicle is properly equipped and maintained. Be sure all tires are inflated properly.

Always wear your seat belt. Be sure children are properly restrained.

Do not drive when you are fatigued, sleepy or distracted. Avoid driving at night.

Never use a cell phone when driving. If you need to use a cell phone find a safe place to exit the roadway.

Never drive under the influence of alcohol or any substance that might impair your vision, judgment, or ability to control the vehicle.

Never tow without properly installed tire straps and vehicle-in-tow security chains.

Never allow passengers to ride inside the vehicle-in-tow or on the auto transport trailer.

No open or soft-top sport utility vehicle is allowed to tow a auto transport trailer, because in the event of a crash, these vehicles offer less collision and ejection protection.

Equipment

Your tow vehicle

For occasional towing, your vehicle can tow an auto transport trailer, provided the curb weight of your tow vehicle is at least 80% of the combined weight of your vehicle-in-tow and your auto transport trailer. Never use a tow vehicle different than listed on your rental contract.

Refer to the owner’s manual, decal instructions or an authorized automotive dealer for any specific handling characteristics of your tow vehicle.

Changes to your tow vehicle from how it was manufactured can affect its ability to tow. These changes can include different tires, suspension changes, etc. Check your owner’s manual or with an authorized automotive dealer to make sure any changes to your tow vehicle are approved. Do not tow the auto transport trailer if your tow vehicle has changes that are not approved.

Avoid driving on a compact spare tire any longer than necessary. Follow the vehicle manufacturer instructions.

Maintenance

Maintenance and condition of your tow vehicle’s engine, transmission, steering, suspension, front-end alignment, and tires, may affect the vehicle’s ability to tow the auto transport trailer. Have an authorized repair facility inspect and repair your vehicle before towing.

To find the capabilities of the engine, transmission and axles of your vehicle for towing, refer to the owner’s manual, or check with an authorized dealer.

Towing equipment requirements

Hitches

Hitches must be able to tow the weight of the auto transport trailer and your vehicle-in-tow. A U-Haul representative can advise you on the type of hitch required for your intended use.

Hitch-Balls

Hitch-ball sizes of 1-7/8 and 2 inches are acceptable with a U-Haul auto transport trailer coupler. A U-Haul representative can advise you on the correct ball size and weight rating for the auto transport trailer.

Other Hitch Systems

Weight distributing or sway control devices are not used for towing a U-Haul auto transport trailer. Towing a properly loaded auto transport trailer does not require these devices. These devices may have a negative effect on vehicle handling and braking and may restrict the operation of the coupling mechanism.

Lights and Mirrors

When towing a auto transport trailer, all lights must be operational. Your tow vehicle may require external mirrors on both sides. A U-Haul representative can advise you of the systems available if your vehicle is not properly equipped.

Loading your tow vehicle

To find how much weight you are allowed to put in your tow vehicle:

Step 1: Find your tow vehicle GVWR on the label inside the driver’s door.

Step 2: Subtract the curb weight (empty) of your tow vehicle from the GVWR. Contact U-Haul for help in finding the curb weight of your tow vehicle.

Step 3: Subtract 750 pounds from the answer in Step 2. This accounts for the auto transport trailer tongue weight.

The answer in Step 3 is the amount of weight you can put in your tow vehicle. This weight includes driver, passengers, cargo and any additional equipment. If the rear of your tow vehicle seems low, reduce the load in the rear seat, trunk or cargo bed areas. Too much load in the rear can affect handling. If the rear of your tow vehicle still seems low ask your U-Haul representative if your vehicle combination is approved for alternative load position of the vehicle-in-tow, then if approved, follow the special instructions provided on uhaul.com or ask a U-Haul representative for these instructions.

Tire pressure

Set all tires to the proper pressure. Find the recommended cold pressures on the tire sidewall, owner’s manual, your vehicle’s door decal or on the auto transport trailer decal. Do not put more pressure in the tire than is indicated on the tire sidewall. Tire pressures go up during driving. Do not let off this extra pressure.

Air pressure in the rear tires of some tow vehicles may be increased to accommodate the additional weight of the auto transport trailer. Inflate rear tires approximately 6 psi above normal, but do not exceed the pressure limit stamped on tire.

Your vehicle-in-tow

The Maximum weight of the vehicle-in-tow is listed on the fender decal on the auto transport. Never exceed this weight. The allowed vehicle-intow weight may be less for your tow vehicle. Never place a vehicle-in-tow on the auto transport that is different than listed on your rental contract. Exceeding these limits may cause a disturbance or damage to your tow vehicle, auto transport or vehicle-in-tow. If you do not know the weight of your vehicle-in-tow, a U-Haul representative can tell you the approximate empty weight. If this cannot be done, have your vehicle-in-tow weighed at a commercial scale (see the Yellow Pages under “Scales, Public”).

If you have an auto transport trailer with a galvanized silver colored platform, do not load a vehicle-in-tow that is more than 79 inches between the outside of the left tire and the outside of the right tire.

If you have an auto transport trailer with a orange colored platform, do not load a vehicle-in-tow that is more than 75 inches between the outside of the left tire and the outside of the right tire.

Low hanging equipment on your vehicle-in-tow, such as spoilers, air dams, ground effects, etc., may be damaged by contact with the Auto transport trailer during loading and unloading. Make sure there is enough clearance for these items. If there is not enough clearance for these items, they must be removed, or do not load the vehicle-in-tow. Special instructions are offered on uhaul.com for loading vehicles with low ground clearance, by using wood boards or other means and some extra effort.

The auto transport is designed for carrying vehicles with standard, factory-installed suspensions. Modified or lowered suspension vehicles may not fit on the auto transport trailer, damage may occur to the vehicles during loading or transport. U-Haul is not responsible for damage to vehicles with modified suspensions.

Connecting your auto transport trailer

Follow the instructions in this section while hooking up the U-Haul auto transport trailer. A U-Haul representative can assist you if you require assistance.

Lower the coupler onto the hitch-ball and follow the instructions below to properly fasten the coupler to the hitch-ball. Do not allow your self to become distracted. Ensure that the coupler is properly fastened to the hitch-ball before moving to the next step.

Coupler

Push down on the latch (C) and fully loosen the hand-wheel (D) by turning counterclockwise.

Lower the coupler (B) onto the hitch-ball (A) as shown.

Check that the ball clamp (E) is positioned below the coupler (B). The coupler should completely cover and enclose the hitch-ball (A).

Hand tighten the coupler by pushing down on the latch (C) while turning the handwheel (D) clockwise. At least 10 complete revolutions of the handwheel are necessary.

When the handwheel becomes tight, move the tow vehicle forward slightly, or push rearward on the auto transport trailer to ensure that the hitch-ball is properly seated inside the coupler. Recheck that the handwheel is tight.

Check all connections at each stop. Make sure the hitch and hitch-ball are securely attached to your tow vehicle and the auto transport trailer coupler is properly connected to the hitch-ball. Use the checklist at the end of these instructions. If you suspect or detect that something is wrong, contact the nearest U-Haul representative.

Safety chains

The purpose of the safety chains is to keep the auto transport trailer connected to your tow vehicle in the unlikely event the coupler comes off the ball or the ball comes off the hitch. Safety chains are attached to the auto transport trailer tongue and are equipped with “S”-hooks on their free ends. Do not tow the auto transport trailer without the safety chains securely attached to the towing vehicle.

Do not attempt to pull the auto transport trailer by the safety chains alone, unless this is necessary to get the combination off the roadway to a safe place.

The left chain (A) crosses underneath the auto transport trailer tongue (B) and hooks to the right side of the tow vehicle permanent hitch (C) frame or structure, or to the tow vehicle bumper brackets. Do not attach chains to the ball or a ball mount that is removable.

The right chain hooks to the left side in the same manner. The “S”-hooks (D) can be placed through a link in the chain. Crossing the chains under the tongue allows the minimum amount of slack for turning. Control slack by hooking the chain back to itself or by twisting the links to shorten chain. Be sure the “S”-hooks are secured with a rubber retainer (D). The chains need slack to allow your vehicle to make turns. Make sure these chains attach securely to your tow vehicle and do not drag on the roadway.

Emergency brake chain

Trailers with brakes have a third chain, called the emergency brake chain (E). This chain applies the brakes automatically in the unlikely event of a separation of the trailer from the tow vehicle. Attach this chain as close to the vehicle center as possible; to the tow vehicle permanent hitch, frame or structure, or to the bumper brackets. Twist chain to take up most of the slack and secure “S”-hook with rubber retainer. Some slack is necessary to prevent the emergency brake from activating on turns or inclined driveways.

Lighting connections

Make sure all tow vehicle and auto transport trailer lights function properly. The connecting wires need slack to allow your tow vehicle to make turns. Do not allow wires to drag on the roadway.

There are two types of lighting connectors on U-Haul Tow Dollies, the 4-Way Flat connector or the Bullet connector. Identify which type your auto transport trailer has and follow the appropriate instructions below.

4-Way Flat

If your tow vehicle has a 4-way flat lighting system, connect the auto transport trailer lights by plugging the auto transport trailer lighting connection plug into the tow vehicle lighting connection plug. If your tow vehicle does not have a 4-way flat lighting connection system your U-Haul representative will be able to instruct you on the connection steps for your vehicle.

Bullet Connector

If your tow vehicle is equipped to accept a Bullet connector system, follow the instructions listed below. If your tow vehicle does not have a Bullet connector system, your U-Haul representative will be able to instruct you on the connection steps for your vehicle.

The auto transport trailer has a separate lighting wire for the left and right sides. Check that the left auto transport trailer wire is attached to the left side vehicle connector. The right wire must connect to the right side vehicle connector.

The wire on each side of the tongue is made of two separate colored wires. On a auto transport trailer with two wires, the black wire (brake and turn signal) is plugged into the black connector. The white wire (running lights) is plugged into the white connector.

For an auto transport trailer that has three separate colored wires on each side, the black wire (brake lights) is plugged into the black connector. The white wire (running lights) is plugged into the white wire connector. The green wire (turn signal) is plugged into the green connector.

When the auto transport trailer has three wires per side and the tow vehicle only has two connectors per side, do not attach the green (turn signal) wire. The turn signals will work through the black wires.

Loading

Load the heaviest end (engine end) of the vehicle-in-tow to the front of the auto transport trailer. Failure to load facing forward may result in sway or whipping and lead to total loss of control.

Do not load cargo in your vehicle-in-tow or on your auto transport trailer. Loading cargo in your vehicle-in-tow or on your auto transport trailer may result in sway or whipping.

The auto transport trailer may be used to carry certain large items when a vehicle-in-tow is NOT installed. Special instructions are offered on uhaul.com or ask a U-Haul representative for these instructions if you intend to do this. Be sure to load trailer heavier in front and to secure the load.

Before loading your vehicle-in-tow, make sure the Auto transport trailer is securely attached to your tow vehicle. Turn the coupler handwheel clockwise. Make sure the safety chains are properly connected. During the loading process, keep children and others at least 25 feet away.

Be sure to follow these instructions.

    • Park the properly hitched auto transport trailer on level ground, in a straight line with the tow vehicle, in park, motor off, and parking brake set.
    • Fully extend the loading ramps located at the rear of the auto transport trailer.
    • Unlatch the left fender, and rotate it down.
    • Free the tire strap from the ratchet. Pull on the ratchet release and raise the handle as far up as you can. Pull the tire strap out of the ratchet spool. Lay the strap over the outside of the auto transport trailer. Free the strap on the other side in the same manner.

Loading the vehicle-in-tow

  • During the loading process, keep children, bystanders and pets at least 25 feet away.
  • Position the vehicle-in-tow behind the auto transport trailer, centered as well as possible.
  • The heaviest end (usually the engine end) of the vehicle must be loaded to the front of the auto transport trailer. Failure to load the heaviest end in the front may result in sway or whipping.
  • Make sure that the entire width of the tires will be on the ramps before driving on the ramps.
  • Approach ramps slowly. Make sure there is enough clearance for spoilers, air dams, etc. If more clearance is needed, lift the front of the auto transport trailer using the tongue jack. Do not unhook the auto transport trailer from the tow vehicle if the tongue jack is needed.
  • Drive slowly up the ramps, keeping all doors closed on the vehicle being loaded. Drive slowly toward the front of the auto transport trailer. Keep driving forward until the tires contact the tire stops. Do not brake quickly or ram the tire stops at the front of the auto transport trailer. Set the parking brake.
  • The fenders are not to be used as steps at any time. The fenders are not designed to carry the weight of a person. Loss of balance and/or the fenders breaking may result in serious injury.
  • Exit the vehicle-in-tow. Carefully step off the auto transport trailer, using the step provided if necessary. Rotate the left fender up and latch both ends.

Securing the vehicle-in-tow

  • Failure to properly install the tire straps and security chains may result in the vehicle-in-tow separating from the auto transport trailer. This may result in a combination disturbance, a vehicle collision or damage to your vehicle-in-tow.
  • Center the tire straps behind the tires and center the tire strap ratchets in the front of the tires. Place the tire straps over the tires.
  • Put the tire strap through the slot in the ratchet spool. Pull about 6 inches of the tire strap through the ratchet spool. Keeping the strap evenly over the tire, operate the ratchet until the tire strap is tight. Your vehicle-in-tow tires are too big if 6 inches of the tire strap will not pull through the ratchet spool. If the tires are too big, a U-Haul outlet can provide you with special automotive tie down straps. Special instructions are offered on uhaul.com for securing the vehicle-in-tow when the tire straps are not used, or ask a U-Haul representative for these instructions, or follow instructions provided with the automotive tie down straps. Do not tow without vehicle-in-tow properly secured.
  • Make sure that the part of the strap that was placed through the slot is secure between the ratchet shaft and the tire strap. After tightening the straps, push the handles down and completely rearward.
  • Perform the same procedure for the tire on the other side.
  • Connect the front security chain, found on a crossmember at the front of the auto transport trailer, to the vehicle-in tow’s frame or other structural member. Keep the security chain away from brake and fuel lines and other items that may be damaged by the chain. Do not place the chain hook on the vehicle’s frame member or other structural member. Loop the chain around the member and place the hook through the hole in one of the chain links. Leave a few inches of slack in the security chain. Be sure the “S”-hook is secured with a rubber retainer.
  • If the tongue jack was used to add clearance, make sure the jack is fully raised off the ground before towing the auto transport trailer.
  • Failure to fully raise the tongue jack off the ground before towing can cause the auto transport trailer to become detached from the tow vehicle, or cause a combination disturbance.
  • Slide the ramps into the storage compartments. Make sure the latches hold the ramps securely in place.
  • Attach the rear security chain in the same manner as the front security chain was attached.

Towing

Reduce speed

Slow down for curves, adverse weather, hazardous road conditions, road construction and expressway exits. Do not feel secure because your auto transport trailer tows easily at higher speeds. A road hazard that could be avoided at55 mph, may become unavoidable at a higher speed.

When driving at a lower speed you are less likely to lose control of any vehicle, than when driving at a higher speed. Excessive speed is a major cause of accidente.

U-Haul does not recommend using cruise control or overdrive when towing a auto transport trailer.

Stopping and following distance

Your combination is heavier and longer than your vehicle alone. This means it will take you longer to stop.

Allow at least 4 seconds between you and the vehicle in front of you. Start counting when the back of the vehicle in front of you passes a fixed object, such as a line or crack in the road. If the front of your vehicle reaches the object before the end of the 4 seconds, increase your distance.

If you are driving in adverse weather, such as rain, snow, or fog, use at least a 5 second gap.

Whipping

Whipping is violent and uncontrollable sway caused by loading a auto transport trailer heavier in the rear half.

Persistent side to side sway motion is not normal. If this occurs at a certain speed, it is a signal that whipping will likely occur if speed is increased by a small amount. If you notice this behavior immediately slow down and maintain at least 10 mph below the speed this sway was first noticed. Then stop at the first opportunity and reload the vehicle-in-tow facing forward and remove any cargo from the vehicle-in-tow.

Combination disturbances

A “combination disturbance” is improper handling, whipping, sway, over-steering or other deviation of the tow vehicle or auto transport trailer from their intended path, due to one or more causes (improper loading, steering inputs, excessive speed, cross winds, passing vehicles, rough roads, etc).

If a combination disturbance occurs:

Let off the gas pedal. Never speed up to try to control a combination disturbance.

Do not apply your brakes.

Hold the steering wheel in a straight ahead position. Do not try to control the combination disturbance by turning the steering wheel.

After a combination disturbance has stopped:

Pull a safe distance off the roadway and stop. Get all occupants out of the vehicle and away from the roadway.

Check the vehicle-in-tow to make sure the tire straps are properly attached. Also make sure there is no cargo in the vehicle-in-tow and the heavier end (engine end) is loaded to the front of the auto transport trailer.

Check that all the tires are properly inflated and all lug nuts are tight.

Check the trunk or rear cargo area of the towing vehicle to make sure it is not overloaded.

Reduce speed to 55 mph or less. Combination disturbances happen most often at higher speeds.

If the combination disturbance persists, contact the nearest U-Haul representative and have them inspect or exchange the auto transport trailer. If the combination disturbance still occurs, something is wrong with your tow vehicle.

Passing

Your combination is heavier and longer than your tow vehicle alone and you will require more time and distance to pass.

Passing by another vehicle in the same or opposite direction can result in a combination disturbance. See the combination disturbances section on what to do if a combination disturbance happens.

Hills

Slow down before starting down hill. Shift into lower gear and let off the gas pedal, this allows the engine to help you control your speed. Combination disturbances happen more frequently going downhill and at higher speeds.

Do not ride the brake pedal going downhill. Prolonged use of your brakes results in overheating and possible loss of braking. When you need to slow down, apply the brake pedal and slow down below the intended speed. Then let off the brake pedal completely. Repeat as needed.

Shift into lower gear to prevent your tow vehicle from jerking due to engine lugging when traveling up hills. This will improve gas mileage and reduce engine overheating

Road shoulders

If a wheel goes off the paved roadway:

Do not turn the steering wheel sharply.

Do not apply your brakes.

Let off the gas pedal and slow down below 25 mph. Then steer gradually back on the roadway. Proceed with caution entering traffic.

The auto transport trailer is wider than the tow vehicle. Allow for this by driving in the center of your lane.

Backing up

Keep your hand at the bottom of the steering wheel. To move the auto transport trailer left, move your hand left. To move the auto transport trailer right, move your hand right. If your combination starts to jackknife, or isn’t headed where you want it, stop. Pull forward to straighten out, then start again.

Get help to watch as you are backing. If you cannot get help, exit your vehicle and make sure there are no people or obstructions in the way.

Breakdowns

Immediately park your combination in a safe place, completely off the roadway. Turn on your emergency flashers. Get all occupants out of the vehicle and away from the roadway.

If you must continue on the roadway to reach a safe place off the road, turn on your emergency flashers and proceed with caution.

If necessary, drive on a flat tire to reach a safe place completely off the roadway. Drive slowly.

If the auto transport trailer’s mechanical problem is minor, and the combination can be safely driven, proceed to the nearest U-Haul location or call the U-Haul Hotline at 1-800-528-0355.

If the mechanical problem is major or if the auto transport trailer is inoperable or cannot be driven safely, call U-Haul Hotline at 1-800-528-0355. Be prepared to give your exact location and a callback telephone number. Have your contract with you when you call. The Hotline will have a U-Haul representative contact you and do whatever is necessary.

Accidents

In case of an accident, get everyone out of the vehicle and completely off the roadway. Call an ambulance if anyone is injured. Notify the police as soon as possible and then call U-Haul Hotline.

Unloading

Before unloading your vehicle-in-tow make sure the auto transport trailer is securely attached to your tow vehicle. Turn the coupler handwheel clockwise. Make sure the safety chains are properly connected. Place the combination on level ground. Make sure the auto transport trailer is directly behind the tow vehicle, in a straight line. Set the tow vehicle’s parking brake firmly and turn the motor off. Allow room behind the auto transport trailer to back the vehicle-in-tow clear of the auto transport trailer.

Never unhook the auto transport trailer or loosen the coupler before unloading.

During the unloading process, keep children and others at least 25 feet away.

Be sure to follow these instructions

  • Fully extend the loading ramps.
  • If more clearance for the vehicle-in-tow was needed in the loading process, lift the front of the auto transport trailer using the tongue jack. Do not unhook the auto transport trailer from the tow vehicle if use of the tongue jack is needed.
  • Unlatch the left fender and rotate it down fully.
  • Disconnect the security chains from the vehicle-intow. Free the tire straps from the ratchets and lay them over the sides of the auto transport trailer.
  • Enter the vehicle-in-tow. Release the parking brake on the vehicle-in-tow. Leave all doors closed during the unloading process.
  • Slowly drive the vehicle-in-tow off the auto transport trailer.
  • Slide the ramps into the storage compartments. Make sure the latches hold the ramps securely in place..
  • Rotate the left fender up and latch both ends.
  • If the tongue jack was used to add clearance, make sure the jack is fully raised off the ground before towing the auto transport trailer.
  • Failure to fully raise the tongue jack off the ground before towing can cause the auto transport trailer to become detached from the tow vehicle, or cause a combination disturbance.
  • Route the security chains through the “D” rings located on the frame, then attach the hook through a hole in the chain. Remove as much slack as possible.
  • Place the end of the tire straps through the slots in the ratchet spools, then tighten the tire straps as far as the ratchet allows.

Towing checklist

Before towing

  • Towing hitch and hitch-ball are tight.
  • Coupler handwheel is tight.
  • Safety chains tire straps and security chains are properly attached and secure.
  • All lights are connected and working.
  • Check all tires for correct pressure.
  • Load vehicle-in-tow heavier end (engine end) toward the front of the auto transport.
  • Ramps securely stored and latched.
  • Tongue jack is fully raised.

Before driving

  • Fasten seatbelts.
  • Properly adjust mirrors.

On the road

  • Reduce speed to 55 mph or below.
  • Stop often for rest.
  • Inspect your vehicles and auto transport trailer connections at each stop.
  • Anticipate stops, brake early.

Remember – crashes are caused by

Driver error or Inattention.

Excessive speed.

Failure to load vehicle-in-tow facing forward.

You should always

Load trailer heavier in front

Reduce your normal driving speed

Wear your seatbelt

 

 

 

 


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Blytheville 4th of July!

 

 

 

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Interviewing

I don’t enjoy interviewing that much.  Who does?  But I was engulfed in fine tuning myself for one back in June when I was desperate for a new job.  I am kind of fascinated with it since I’ve been on both sides of the table quite a bit in the past year.   Here is an article I found when I glanced at CNN’s “don’t miss” section.

 

7 things you should never say in an interview

 

(CareerBuilder.com) — You dry cleaned your suit. You’ve got a dozen copies of your résumé, just in case. You arrived early — but not too early. You silenced your cell phone. You made small talk with the receptionist, and you’re pretty sure the two of you will be best friends one day. Now, you’re about to confidently head into an interview for a job you’re dying to land.

Don’t ruin it all by saying any of the following to your interviewer:

‘My last boss was an idiot’

No matter how terrible your last boss was, or how glad you are to be free of your previous company, keep it to yourself. Not only will you look immature and negative if you start griping, but you also never know whom your interviewer is connected to. Your interviewer and your former boss may be old fraternity brothers, for all you know.

“Do not gossip or speak badly about anyone you’ve worked with or for, even if they’re currently serving time in state prison for what they did,” says Gayl Murphy, author of “Interview Tactics: How to Survive the Media without Getting Clobbered.”

“Even if the [interviewer tries to] push you into it. Remember, it’s all a test. Be graceful and polite, you could be talking about [his or her] brother-in-law.”

 

‘Yes. Yes. Yes. No.’

Unless the interviewer asks you if you’re so-and-so here for the nine-o’clock interview, you shouldn’t be using one-word answers. An interview is your time to convince the employer that you have the qualifications for the job.

Even if the questions don’t seem open-ended, answer them as if they are. You don’t need to drone on and on, but use every chance you get to prove why you’re the right person for the job.

“You want to use as much color and detail as possible when describing your background, experience and your professional journey, but without being long winded because, in reality, it’s about your skill set and your valuable experience and expertise. Be specific: use names, dates and places,” Murphy says.

‘Let me tell you what I think about religion and politics …’

Like a first date, an interview is no time to bring up religion or politics. If these touchy subjects can spark heated debates amongst even the closest of friends, imagine what kind of argument you could get into with a stranger.

“When being interviewed for a job, deciding what to say and what to keep to your self has always been challenging, especially since there are so many different opinions out there,” says Murphy. “[But] unless you’re going for a job as a pastor or rabbi, it’s best to steer clear of religious tenants.”

Ditto for politics; unless it’s a key part of the job, it’s best to avoid sharing political opinions.

‘Of course I know HTML coding/ my way around China/ the nuances of quantitative behavioral finance!’

An interview is not the place to embellish your work or personal experience. If an interviewer asks you about something you don’t have experience with, fess up and tell them how willing and able you are to learn new things.

If you claim to be something you’re not, chances are you’ll be found out sooner or later … maybe not during the interview process, but when you find yourself lost in the middle of China a few months after landing the job, your gig will be up.

“Don’t make up anything about what you’ve done that isn’t true. It’s too easy these days to get busted for anything like that. And they are looking at anything and everything,” Murphy says.

‘Hey man, do you want to grab a drink after this?’

No matter how well you hit it off with your interviewer or how great your conversation goes, your interviewer is not your friend — even if you find out you’re both getting married on the same day or you’re both obsessed with college football. The relationship is still a professional one, so resist the urge to spill too many personal or off-topic details, or to start calling your interviewer “buddy,” “girl,” “hon” or “man.”

 

‘Hahahaaaaa! AAAAAhaaahahaaa!’

Okay, so someone cracked a joke. It’s probable that in the duration of your professional career, you’ll come across an interviewer with a good sense of humor. It’s even okay to laugh at a joke made during the interview. Just don’t die laughing. No one looks professional with cackle-induced teary eyes, teeth and gums-a-blazing.

Should you find yourself surpassing the point of no return in your fit of laughter, take a deep breath, and think about how awful you’ll feel if you don’t get the job. It may seem like a buzzkill, but there’s a time and a place for everything, including hysterics.

 

“I mean, I’m not THAT great”

Now is not the time for modesty, false or otherwise. While you don’t want to come across like a used car salesman, you are there to sell yourself. Or, as Murphy puts it “Know in your bones you have an awesome product.” And don’t be afraid to sell it.

 

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Lunar Eclipse

Here’s a guide to viewing the lunar eclipse early Tuesday morning (or late Monday night?).  I’d really enjoy watching this, but I will probably sleep through it.

 

 

Here’s a link to more info about it.

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